Celtic Winter Solstice at Thermenhotel Norica

Wintersonnenwende Bad Hofgastein

05.10.2015 - On 21 December 2015, Thermenhotel Norica celebrates the winter solstice – the longest night of the year. At the same time, incense expert Friedrich Kaindlstorfer will whisk you away into the world of the Ancient Celts: Guests of the hotel will be able to convince themselves of the powers of incense. Not only the name of the hotel itself, but also that of Hotel Norica’s wellness area – the Celtic Spa – were influenced by the Celts. No wonder, then, that the “Festival of Light”, the winter solstice, is celebrated here at the Thermenhotel: December 21st, the longest night of the year, fascinates with its Celtic rituals.


On 21 December 2015, Thermenhotel Norica celebrates the winter solstice – the longest night of the year. At the same time, incense expert Friedrich Kaindlstorfer will whisk you away into the world of the Ancient Celts: Guests of the hotel will be able to convince themselves of the powers of incense. Not only the name of the hotel itself, but also that of Hotel Norica’s wellness area – the Celtic Spa – were influenced by the Celts. No wonder, then, that the “Festival of Light”, the winter solstice, is celebrated here at the Thermenhotel: December 21st, the longest night of the year, fascinates with its Celtic rituals.

Incense that cleanses

Friedrich Kaindlstorfer – general manager of the 1st Center for Traditional European Medicine in Bad Kreuzen (Upper Austria) – presents the history and methods of incense burning as first practiced by the Celts: At the time of the winter solstice, those plants are burned which bear the so-called solar signature: for example, elfwort, St. John’s wort, mistletoe, cloves, cinnamon and rose petals. This incense ritual has a cleansing effect: “It can help the body to gain strength, settle the spirit and activate self-healing powers”, states Kaindlstorfer.

Kissing under the mistletoe

Kaindlstorfer shows hotel guests yet another custom: here in the Angle-Saxon world, we know the ritual of hanging up a branch of mistletoe, though its origins lie with the Celts. Wishes expressed under the mistletoe have a special power and are more likely to come true. Of course, kissing under the mistletoe is especially beautiful: Those who politely ask for permission to do so, have an opportunity for enduring love, happiness and a long life.